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October 22, 2018, 06:04:04 PM


Author Topic: Photoshoot Basics  (Read 4553 times)

Offline Ctwo

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Photoshoot Basics
« on: October 07, 2015, 11:12:34 AM »
Hi All, it's been a long while since I've used my camera. I now have a newbie type question about professional photoshoots, as a customer.

We are using a new photographer to shoot instruments with color themes much like the 90's era PC computers, cream and grays...

The photos seem to be soft to me. I looked at the settings: ISO 6400, 1/125 shutter, f22

This would be inside studio with lighting on a tripod.

I asked the photographer why he uses such a high ISO and he said for increased contrast, but he also plans to make them pop by adjusting the contrast in Lightroom. He also touted the performance of his EOS 5D M3 with noise filter and contrast settings. I just think he is off on the settings and thought he should use longer shutter and bring the ISO down to 100, and even a larger f-stop, say around f11.

But then I found this site comparing ISO of the camera, and these photos look so much better, even with high ISO:
http://www.dpreview.com/sample-galleries/6555296250/canon-eos-5d-mark-iii-low-light-iso-samples


One other thing that I do not understand, why they insist on shooting on a light or grayish background? I need to make knockouts all the time and quite often the edges get lost. Is there a reason for the background color? I would prefer a high contrast background like green, so I could use the magic wand in PhotoShop!  :o

I think I'll talk to our manager again and see about bringing in my T2i and save us a few thousand bucks. Maybe I'm full of smoke?

Offline Ctwo

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Re: Photoshoot Basics
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2015, 12:03:14 PM »
I attach a sample, scaled down to about 25% with a couple 1:1 sections.

This is ISO6400, f22, 1/400 shutter, 47mm FL. I think he was using an EF 24-100 or in that range lens.

Offline Ochotona

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Re: Photoshoot Basics
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2015, 05:45:58 PM »
These look like macro shots, or at least "extreme close ups", so I suspect the photog was trying to use a very small aperture to obtain maximum depth of focus.  That said, for professional photos I think that is a lazy approach.  Photo stacking would produce better depth of field, and would allow him to use a wider aperture and thus much lower ISO and obtain sharper images.

If that's not why he used the small aperture and high ISO then I really don't get it, and I think you're right to question his abilities.

Offline Ctwo

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Re: Photoshoot Basics
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2015, 11:31:07 PM »
Lollipop is about 12 to 18 inches long. The photo was in landscape and I cropped out most of it.

He had an outdoor shot today. There was discussion of full sun vs shade sites. I had a hard time suggesting any improvements though. It will be a few days for the photos.

We use them in a catalog, not very large images so they will work.

Offline Snapper

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Re: Photoshoot Basics
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2015, 07:04:14 AM »
For me, the guy is talking absolute rubbish! I have a 5D mk3 and although it handles higher ISO settings pretty well, I would always keep the setting as low as possible to get the best sharpness, especially if I also have the camera on a tripod and studio lighting/flash available. Increase the ISO and sharpness will always suffer!

I cannot see why he would try to justify his settings by saying it gives increased contrast when (I assume he was shooting in RAW?) he can increase the contrast, clarity, etc. in Lightroom anyway and have total control. If he starts messing about with contrast, clarity & curves in LR with high ISO settings he is only likely to degrade the image further and depend upon the LR Noise Reduction more.

If he was trying to take pictures of black cats in a darkened cellar on a foggy, moonless night his settings might be appropriate but certainly not in the situation you have described.

Some village is missing their idiot...

I used to be a very negative person... but then I went digital.

Offline Doodle

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Re: Photoshoot Basics
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2015, 12:27:40 PM »
^^ I think Snapper summed it up nicely.^^

For the life of me, I can't comprehend why he would want to go with high ISO for that kind of shot. I just CAN'T.
It makes no sense whatsoever. Someone needs to take a course in basic photography. Soon.
Take your camera with you dammit. You can't take your next "best photo" if your camera is sitting at home in the bag, now can you?

Offline Fyrblade

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Re: Photoshoot Basics
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2015, 11:01:25 PM »
Put another way, he's full of shit and doesn't know what he's doing. 

There is zero benefit gained from using high ISO.  ISO doesn't add contrast; intentionally positioned and adjusted lighting does.
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Offline Bish

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Re: Photoshoot Basics
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2015, 11:08:04 AM »
Put another way, he's full of shit and doesn't know what he's doing. 

There is zero benefit gained from using high ISO.  ISO doesn't add contrast; intentionally positioned and adjusted lighting does.

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Offline Scott S

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Re: Photoshoot Basics
« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2015, 12:21:42 PM »
I'll agree with everyone else, ISO 100 1/200 at f8-11 is plenty for almost any situation.
I think, truth be told, he messes up and left the camera's ISO on auto and had to run the aperture to f22 before he ran out of ISO. I did that once. of course I didn't tell the people it was intentional.
ISO 6400 adds grain, which is the opposite of contrast, it would have the effect of looking less contrasty if anything as the large chunks of grain would soften tonal transitions.