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August 18, 2019, 10:57:22 PM


Author Topic: T2i and light meter calibration question  (Read 3354 times)

Offline f-stop

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T2i and light meter calibration question
« on: August 08, 2013, 08:06:24 PM »
I have a sekonic L478D meter that can be calibrated to the cameras dynamic range.  I have Magic lantern installed as well.  This meter can be set for still or cine profiles.l My question is: With MJ installed, do I treat the camera like a cine or still?

Offline bandmandq

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Re: T2i and light meter calibration question
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2013, 08:30:02 PM »
I have a sekonic L478D meter that can be calibrated to the cameras dynamic range.  I have Magic lantern installed as well.  This meter can be set for still or cine profiles.l My question is: With MJ installed, do I treat the camera like a cine or still?

I do not use Magic Lantern on my camera.  But from what you said about the meter, if you are shooting stills, set it for still, if you are shooting videos, set for cine. 

If I am wrong, someone here will correct me.  :)
Canon T2i w/18-135mm lens, 55-250mm, 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L

Offline Adondo

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Re: T2i and light meter calibration question
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2013, 02:00:05 PM »
Remember: the T2i or any other video camera is taking stills at 30 frames a second. That's what a movie is: low resolution stills (as compared to the usual 18MP) stacked together. Full HD video is 1920x1080 pixels, which is a fraction of the T2i's standard still shot. And, of course, 1/30th second exposure is the SLOWEST possible setting because each frame is only 1/30th of a second in the first place in the rapidly stacked frame photos. The light meter takes that max exposure time into account.

Offline Bif

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Re: T2i and light meter calibration question
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2013, 01:45:35 AM »
The "cine" settings on meters is from the days when motion picture cameras had a rotating disk shutter with a cutout and shutter speed was dependent on frame rate and shutter angle.

With the cameras we have to work with now use the meter as if taking stills for the reasons posted by Adondo.
Always drink upstream from the herd...