Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
June 16, 2019, 01:58:20 PM


Author Topic: [Video Tutorial] DIY Home Depot Steadicam  (Read 33480 times)

Offline Ryan

  • Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 602
    • Canon Rebel T2i / EOS 550D Forum
Re: [Video Tutorial] DIY Home Depot Steadicam
« Reply #45 on: October 11, 2011, 11:28:03 AM »
I would assume that it would work with the 7d.  If it feels top heavy, you could always try adding an extra couple of floor flanges to the bottom to see if that helps.
Lenses: Tokina 11-16mm f2.8, Canon 50mm f1.8
Accessories: Cobracrane Backpacker, Igus Slider, Caselogic SLRC-205 SLR Camera Sling,  Satechi WR-C100 Wireless Remote Control, Lilliput 669HB Field Monitor, Rode VideoMic, DIY Steadicam

Offline timesnewroman

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • this&that
Re: [Video Tutorial] DIY Home Depot Steadicam
« Reply #46 on: December 27, 2011, 06:01:38 AM »
Hey Ryan,

first of all, great work! This is a really great chance for young filmmakers to improve their work.
So I have a little problem, that i would love to solve.
When i first saw the moving results of your home depot steadicam, i was stunned! This thing could have made so many shots so much easier.

Full of pleasure, i odered the manfrotto adapter and ran towards the next next home depot in my city Munich (Germany), but i couldn't find any of the material needed to build one.
So I tried another home depot, but couldn't find anything either.
In the End, a salesman told me, that you couldn't get those kind of things in german home depots. (american standards are different than german)

That was a kick in the ass. I looked up for alternative parts, but in all cases there were missing links in the end.
I tried to order parts from the american home depot homepage, but no success. Only expensive stuff will be shipped.

So my question is, are there any possibilities to get the parts or a built one steadicam from you guys?
i would really appreciate your help!
thx roman



Offline Ryan

  • Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 602
    • Canon Rebel T2i / EOS 550D Forum
Re: [Video Tutorial] DIY Home Depot Steadicam
« Reply #47 on: January 06, 2012, 11:23:18 AM »
Hey Ryan,

first of all, great work! This is a really great chance for young filmmakers to improve their work.
So I have a little problem, that i would love to solve.
When i first saw the moving results of your home depot steadicam, i was stunned! This thing could have made so many shots so much easier.

Full of pleasure, i odered the manfrotto adapter and ran towards the next next home depot in my city Munich (Germany), but i couldn't find any of the material needed to build one.
So I tried another home depot, but couldn't find anything either.
In the End, a salesman told me, that you couldn't get those kind of things in german home depots. (american standards are different than german)

That was a kick in the ass. I looked up for alternative parts, but in all cases there were missing links in the end.
I tried to order parts from the american home depot homepage, but no success. Only expensive stuff will be shipped.

So my question is, are there any possibilities to get the parts or a built one steadicam from you guys?
i would really appreciate your help!
thx roman

Unfortunately, I'm a one-man show and just don't have any extra time to gather the components or put extra rigs together to sell.  If I were you, I would try to find something that closely matches the parts I described and experiment.  I used Cotton Candy productions youtube video as a starting point and decided to play around with different components until something worked.
Lenses: Tokina 11-16mm f2.8, Canon 50mm f1.8
Accessories: Cobracrane Backpacker, Igus Slider, Caselogic SLRC-205 SLR Camera Sling,  Satechi WR-C100 Wireless Remote Control, Lilliput 669HB Field Monitor, Rode VideoMic, DIY Steadicam

Offline iCodf

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 51
Re: [Video Tutorial] DIY Home Depot Steadicam
« Reply #48 on: February 20, 2013, 02:20:21 PM »
Old thread I know but.... I thought I'd share my first attempt at a rig



Here is the base, all we added to it was a chopping board (cable ties) with the correct thread drilled in and a bolt and washer system through a mousemat...you know non-slip haha. The back is foam pipe insulation and the idea was you'd stick your head through the middle and rest it on both shoulders - we later added 2.5KG resistance bands from a local sports shop as a counter balance on the back.

Here is a shot of it in action...(Not me)



For the record the stealth black look is achieved by using 3 rolls of electrical tape and for the handles, my brothers bike is missing some grips...everything else is standard PVC piping.
Canon 24-105 L - Samyang 14mm - 50mm 1.8 - Rode Videomic - Seagull LCD Viewfinder - Battery grip