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Author Topic: Aperture Priority versus Manual Mode  (Read 1663 times)

Offline bandmandq

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Aperture Priority versus Manual Mode
« on: August 31, 2013, 01:33:08 PM »
Found this article and thought some might find it informative. I totally agree with this person"s view 100%.

http://photofocus.com/2013/08/28/aperture-priority-versus-manual-mode/
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Offline Doodle

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Re: Aperture Priority versus Manual Mode
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2013, 01:54:54 PM »
This has been my theory all along.  I've had more than a few lively debates over this with some that felt Manual was the only way to be considered a real photographer.
It wasn't until I realized that the guys I try to pattern my photography after (as in watching and learning what they do) such as Scott Kelby and Moose Peterson, who both use predominately Av mode, did I finally feel comfortable about using it.

Moose in particular, because of what he shoots (birds, aircraft, etc), he stays in either Av mode or in the case of a prop aircraft he goes to Tv mode to get the right speed to blur the props.

I definitely use Manual for my water drop shots and probably most all of my other macro work, but I realized a long time ago that Av mode is my go-to mode now and it works.
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Offline bandmandq

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Re: Aperture Priority versus Manual Mode
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2013, 03:05:40 PM »
Growing up and learning to be a photographer in the film days, it was all what that article mentions, moving knobs, buttons, centering the meter in the middle...etc.  One of the things i really like about these new fangled DSLR is that it will do some of that work for me.

I realize to fully grasp what is happening, and to get a person aware of all the facets of taking "real" photos so you can be considered a "real" photographer is learning HOW to move those knobs, buttons and metering correctly to get that great shot.  So that is why he starts off by mentioning that so many people want to shoot in Manual or should learn to shoot in Manual Mode.  I agree, but then we PAY for all the "bells and whistles" of the semi auto modes and then never use them?  CRAZY in my book.

I am right there with you Doodle.
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Offline Skippy

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Re: Aperture Priority versus Manual Mode
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2013, 05:24:35 PM »
I have zero problem using AV or TV. I don't use TV often but I am going to try to shoot my next HS football game in TV. Going to set at 1/1000 which will open my aperture all the way and then let the ISO run in auto. I will also shoot 2/3rds to the right.

I guess you can say that I agree with the article. I shot last night in Manual and really I don't find that to be hard to do at all as I just pick my speeds and check the histogram every 10 or 15 minutes but I think TV would work just fine.

I also leave my camera in AV when I am walking or driving around and might expect something to "pop" right up in front of me. In the past I used to preset the camera in manual but I have found that AV does a fine job.
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Offline ARPhot

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Re: Aperture Priority versus Manual Mode
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2013, 04:47:26 PM »
Skippy - when you say you leave you camera in AV while driving, do you mean that you would take shots while driving versus seeing something and then stopping to shoot? I'm guessing the latter because the images would be blurry right? I always use AV and use TV for moving subjects.
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Offline SkierBoy

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Re: Aperture Priority versus Manual Mode
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2013, 05:03:35 PM »
My default is Tv mode with the shutter set to 1/200 and my 15-85mm on. The reason being that if I grab it quick to get a shot then that shutter speed will make sure most things are sharp but if there is low light it won't force the ISO too high.

I find Av to give far too slow a shutter speed before it automatically ups the ISO and end up with blurry shots. If I want DoF controlled I usually end up in manual.

Am I missing something or have a setting wrong fir Av use as I know it's the go to setting for most people?
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Offline Doodle

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Re: Aperture Priority versus Manual Mode
« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2013, 05:25:47 PM »
My default is Tv mode with the shutter set to 1/200 and my 15-85mm on. The reason being that if I grab it quick to get a shot then that shutter speed will make sure most things are sharp but if there is low light it won't force the ISO too high.

I find Av to give far too slow a shutter speed before it automatically ups the ISO and end up with blurry shots. If I want DoF controlled I usually end up in manual.

Am I missing something or have a setting wrong fir Av use as I know it's the go to setting for most people?

Naa, you're not missing anything.  I suppose it has a lot to do with what you think you might be shooting.
For me, I just prefer the DoF to be controlled.  That's my personal priority.   Oh, personally speaking...I don't use auto ISO.  I try to set that as low as I think I can get by with (to reduce as much noise as I can) and just let the camera control the shutter speed.   And like you, if I have to, I will go into manual mode if my Av mode fails me.
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Offline Suka

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Re: Aperture Priority versus Manual Mode
« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2013, 06:21:37 PM »
I must be missing something here.  There are just too many variables going on to say Av is better than Manual, or Tv is better than Av, etc.  My walk around setting is Tv adjusted to the lens I'm using with auto ISO.  Aperture is the least of my concern if I am on the go and have the camera set to center point focus and spot metering.   

Offline Doodle

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Re: Aperture Priority versus Manual Mode
« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2013, 06:34:57 PM »
I must be missing something here.  There are just too many variables going on to say Av is better than Manual, or Tv is better than Av, etc.  My walk around setting is Tv adjusted to the lens I'm using with auto ISO.  Aperture is the least of my concern if I am on the go and have the camera set to center point focus and spot metering.

Nope, you aren't missing anything either.  It's purely personal preference.
Some like Manual, some like Tv and some (I'm in this camp) like Av mode. There is no right or wrong.
I think the author of the article that the poster started this thread for is just saying you don't NEED to go to manual if you don't want to.
If Tv is your go-to setting, I say stick with it! 
When I was trying manual for everything, I was getting frustrated because I couldn't change settings fast enough for what I wanted to do.  I thought I was failing or something.  Then after reading on how some of the photographers I read about use Av (or Tv) modes by default, I went that route and found it a lot easier for me.  Manual will always be my go-to mode for my Macro stuff, but otherwise I just want DoF to be my priority.  It's just my personal preference is all.

Besides, whatever you are doing to get those amazing hummingbird shots...KEEP DOING IT.  Screw a bunch of what anyone else says is right or wrong.  ::)
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Offline bandmandq

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Re: Aperture Priority versus Manual Mode
« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2013, 07:56:41 PM »
Doodle pretty much says what I feel, especially about personal preference.  Av mode is my standard mode also as my lens seems to be the SHARPEST at f/8 so I leave it at that for the sharpness AND DoF.

When shooting moving subjects, I switch to Tv mode.

I NEVER use auto ISO because when I first started shooting I had some shots that it picked CRAZY high ISO for no apparent reason.  So I prefer to adjust my own ISO as the situation calls for it.  Which might also mean changing f stop to get the shutter speed range I can handle.

So in essence, I AM in manual mode, I just do not have to think so hard and that is a very GOOD thing at my age!  :)
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Offline Skippy

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Re: Aperture Priority versus Manual Mode
« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2013, 08:42:46 PM »
Skippy - when you say you leave you camera in AV while driving, do you mean that you would take shots while driving versus seeing something and then stopping to shoot? I'm guessing the latter because the images would be blurry right? I always use AV and use TV for moving subjects.
What I mean is when I am out on some sort of shoot and driving between spots or something like that I leave my camera in AV. The reason is because often times I will see something very quickly that I have no time for other than pointing and shooting. I seen a very interesting bear last year that I was not at all prepared for. My camera was still in waterfall mode and since then I make it a habit to switch over in case I need to snap a very quick shot. Having said that, if I seen something very interesting that I could pull over and shoot the right way then I certainly would.
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