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Author Topic: IS modes: do you use them?  (Read 4599 times)

Offline Doodle

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IS modes: do you use them?
« on: February 07, 2015, 07:21:13 PM »
I'm kind of curious if anyone uses the various modes available on some lens for Image Stabilization?
Some just have On/Off while others have 2 or even 3 "Modes". 
My 100-400 (old style) has 2:
One for all axis movement and mode 2 is for one directional (horizontal) movement such as panning.
I always had mine set on 1 (default I assume).  Last week, I decided to try Mode 2 for panning while doing a bird shoot (Eagles at the river).
My clear shot-to-blurry shot ratio got much better.  Why was I so slow to try the different mode? I can't answer other than laziness.
What about you guys? Do you use the various modes at all? Am I the only one who was too damn lazy to try them before this?  (careful how you answer that one. ;) )
Anyhow, I used it during my last eagle outing at the river and was impressed with how much clearer my shots were, or rather, I had noticeably less fuzzy shots.
What say you?
Take your camera with you dammit. You can't take your next "best photo" if your camera is sitting at home in the bag, now can you?

Offline Ochotona

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Re: IS modes: do you use them?
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2015, 08:28:46 AM »
I'm kind of curious if anyone uses the various modes available on some lens for Image Stabilization?
Some just have On/Off while others have 2 or even 3 "Modes". 
My 100-400 (old style) has 2:
One for all axis movement and mode 2 is for one directional (horizontal) movement such as panning.
I always had mine set on 1 (default I assume).  Last week, I decided to try Mode 2 for panning while doing a bird shoot (Eagles at the river).
My clear shot-to-blurry shot ratio got much better.  Why was I so slow to try the different mode? I can't answer other than laziness.
What about you guys? Do you use the various modes at all? Am I the only one who was too damn lazy to try them before this?  (careful how you answer that one. ;) )
Anyhow, I used it during my last eagle outing at the river and was impressed with how much clearer my shots were, or rather, I had noticeably less fuzzy shots.
What say you?

No comment.    :D

I don't have any lenses with more than 1 mode of IS, but I did know IS mode II on canon lenses is for panning.  Glad to hear it works well for (I assume) hand-held panning.  I wasn't sure if it was intended for use with a panning tripod head or hand-held.

Offline Doodle

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Re: IS modes: do you use them?
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2015, 12:37:36 PM »
I'm kind of curious if anyone uses the various modes available on some lens for Image Stabilization?
Some just have On/Off while others have 2 or even 3 "Modes". 
My 100-400 (old style) has 2:
One for all axis movement and mode 2 is for one directional (horizontal) movement such as panning.
I always had mine set on 1 (default I assume).  Last week, I decided to try Mode 2 for panning while doing a bird shoot (Eagles at the river).
My clear shot-to-blurry shot ratio got much better.  Why was I so slow to try the different mode? I can't answer other than laziness.
What about you guys? Do you use the various modes at all? Am I the only one who was too damn lazy to try them before this?  (careful how you answer that one. ;) )
Anyhow, I used it during my last eagle outing at the river and was impressed with how much clearer my shots were, or rather, I had noticeably less fuzzy shots.
What say you?

No comment.    :D

I don't have any lenses with more than 1 mode of IS, but I did know IS mode II on canon lenses is for panning.  Glad to hear it works well for (I assume) hand-held panning.  I wasn't sure if it was intended for use with a panning tripod head or hand-held.
My shots are all hand held.  Don't quote me on this but I think that 3rd mode is specifically designed to recognize if a tripod/monopod is in use.
I tried a tripod for about 2 minutes when shooting the eagles. It's fine for limited range but I like taking the shots of them as they fly overhead too and for that...I had to lift the entire setup. That didn't last long.  ???
Take your camera with you dammit. You can't take your next "best photo" if your camera is sitting at home in the bag, now can you?

Offline zubbuz

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Re: IS modes: do you use them?
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2015, 03:16:29 PM »
The only lenses with IS that I have are ones with an on or off switch :P

Since I do a ton of my stuff on tripod it is very rarely even on (as you should always turn it off when the camera is locked in place). To top it off, two of my primary go-to lenses (Rokinon 8mm and Canon 10-22) don't even have IS! Although being that wide, they don't really need it....
You are young. Life has been kind to you. You will learn.

Canon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 / Canon 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II / Canon 10-22mm f/3.5-5.6 / Canon 50mm f1.8 / Rokinon 8mm 3.5 / Yongnuo YN-468 II

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Offline Doodle

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Re: IS modes: do you use them?
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2015, 04:02:08 PM »
The only lenses with IS that I have are ones with an on or off switch :P

Since I do a ton of my stuff on tripod it is very rarely even on (as you should always turn it off when the camera is locked in place). To top it off, two of my primary go-to lenses (Rokinon 8mm and Canon 10-22) don't even have IS! Although being that wide, they don't really need it....

I honestly think this is one reason why I never took mine off of Mode 1.  My previous lens only had on/off and I never gave it any thought to the additional modes being any better so I left it where it was when I got it.
Yea, I'm slow but sincere. ;)
Take your camera with you dammit. You can't take your next "best photo" if your camera is sitting at home in the bag, now can you?

Offline AndyCivil

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Re: IS modes: do you use them?
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2015, 04:50:23 PM »
Now I've got mode envy  :'(

Offline Suka

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Re: IS modes: do you use them?
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2015, 06:24:17 PM »
I'm kind of curious if anyone uses the various modes available on some lens for Image Stabilization?
Some just have On/Off while others have 2 or even 3 "Modes". 
My 100-400 (old style) has 2:
One for all axis movement and mode 2 is for one directional (horizontal) movement such as panning.
I always had mine set on 1 (default I assume).  Last week, I decided to try Mode 2 for panning while doing a bird shoot (Eagles at the river).
My clear shot-to-blurry shot ratio got much better.  Why was I so slow to try the different mode? I can't answer other than laziness.
What about you guys? Do you use the various modes at all? Am I the only one who was too damn lazy to try them before this?  (careful how you answer that one. ;) )

Hey bud, glad you posted this question.  I was going to PM you about which IS mode you used for those eagle shots using the 100-400 L.  I have played around a lot with IS, either 1 or 2 Mode on the 100-400.  Have researched this on which is better to use at different times and when not to use either one. Obviously, neither on a tripod.  Also, not to use IS on this lens or any other if shooting over 1000 shutter speed- don't know about that.  Since I take most of my bird shots at 1/1000 or faster, the IS really hasn't factored into my settings.  Maybe it should, but don't think it would make my shots any better-they suck either way.

     
Anyhow, I used it during my last eagle outing at the river and was impressed with how much clearer my shots were, or rather, I had noticeably less fuzzy shots.
What say you?

Offline Doodle

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Re: IS modes: do you use them?
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2015, 06:59:41 PM »
Suka, to answer your question about high speed and IS:  I just leave it on. It certainly won't hurt or interfere if your shutter speed goes that high but if it drops down in a darker setting (this is assuming Av mode...) then it will help in certain cases.  Agreed that it should be left off when using a tripod or monopod but otherwise...I just leave mine on full time.
Take your camera with you dammit. You can't take your next "best photo" if your camera is sitting at home in the bag, now can you?

Offline Ochotona

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Re: IS modes: do you use them?
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2015, 08:55:44 AM »
The old dog (get it?) might be on to something.  This is from birdphotographers.net  http://www.birdphotographers.net/forums/showthread.php/107599-Does-IS-help-on-fast-shutter-speeds?highlight=stabilization

Quote
If you are using the Canon 300 f/4, it is version 1 IS and does cause degradation of image quality at shutter speeds around 1/2000 second and above. Newer IS versions (found in the 300 f/2.8 and up, even version 1 lenses) do not have this problem.

IS hand held or also on a beanbag, or tracking with a gimball mount will benefit from IS as it stabilizes the image for the AF system, making AF more accurate.

Regarding the Hogan article, it says keep VR off unless needed, and not to use it over 1/500 second. He talks about sampling frequemcy. This is the problem with the Canon IS version 1 on the 300 f/4, but the problem on Canon does not appear until well above 1/1000 second, and I think that is the only telephoto lens with the issue (maybe the 100-400?).

I often shoot at 1/2000 to 1/4000 second and occasionally 1/6000 second with my 300 f/2.8 and 500 f/4 version 1 leneses with ho IS issues. I simply leave it on unless locked down on a tripod. I often use beanbags from safari vehicles and occasionall the IS gets turned off and image quality suffers even with 300 mm (especially in low light, or tracking a subject--if a subject starts moving, I pick up the lens and hand hold and track). I can usually spot this after only a few frames, seeing no stabilization in the viewfinder.

I keep IS on all the time unless on a tripod with the axes locked. the 300 f/4 is the only exception: I'll turn off the IS for shutter speeds above about 1/1500 second. The 300 f/4 is in need of an upgrade.

Offline Doodle

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Re: IS modes: do you use them?
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2015, 09:23:48 AM »
Who you callin' an old dog??  8)
Take your camera with you dammit. You can't take your next "best photo" if your camera is sitting at home in the bag, now can you?

Offline Ochotona

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Re: IS modes: do you use them?
« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2015, 09:28:26 AM »
Who you callin' an old dog??  8)

Not you, the guy with the dog avatar!

Offline Doodle

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Re: IS modes: do you use them?
« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2015, 10:57:58 AM »
Who you callin' an old dog??  8)

Not you, the guy with the dog avatar!
Oh that's OK then.  ;D

btw...I don't agree with that guy you quoted entirely. Or he needs to clarify some things. Like this quote:
"IS hand held or also on a beanbag, or tracking with a gimball mount will benefit from IS as it stabilizes the image for the AF system, making AF more accurate.".  Not entirely true if you have 2 modes of IS.
As we know, IS checks for movement up and down and side to side, or in the case of Mode 2, up and down only, giving you the side to side when panning.  His statement above refers to just mode 2. If an early version of IS is on a gimball and tracking a bird going across his field of vision, it will still be looking for both axis of movement but only find one...and could degrade the image while still looking for side to side motion.
Also, he refers to a "Hogan article" that uses VR.  He then (in parenthesis) mentioned the 100-400. I wonder why he included that? I haven't seen that issue and am not aware of others experiencing it.
The rest of his quote I obviously agree with as I leave my IS on also. (Great minds think alike? Oh no..wait...)
But let it be known now: I can take blurry shots with shutter speeds over 1000.  It's hard but I can screw up ANY speed if I try hard enough!  (I think I have lousy panning techniques if I had to pinpoint a reason for that)
Take your camera with you dammit. You can't take your next "best photo" if your camera is sitting at home in the bag, now can you?

Offline Suka

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Re: IS modes: do you use them?
« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2015, 06:33:45 PM »
Who you callin' an old dog??  8)

Not you, the guy with the dog avatar!

Me?  How dare you. 

Offline Doodle

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Re: IS modes: do you use them?
« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2015, 06:44:31 PM »
Who you callin' an old dog??  8)

Not you, the guy with the dog avatar!

Me?  How dare you.

These young whipper-snappers these days Suka. I tell ya...
Take your camera with you dammit. You can't take your next "best photo" if your camera is sitting at home in the bag, now can you?

Offline Suka

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Re: IS modes: do you use them?
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2015, 07:34:45 PM »
Who you callin' an old dog??  8)

Not you, the guy with the dog avatar!
Oh that's OK then.  ;D

btw...I don't agree with that guy you quoted entirely. Or he needs to clarify some things. Like this quote:
"IS hand held or also on a beanbag, or tracking with a gimball mount will benefit from IS as it stabilizes the image for the AF system, making AF more accurate.".  Not entirely true if you have 2 modes of IS.
As we know, IS checks for movement up and down and side to side, or in the case of Mode 2, up and down only, giving you the side to side when panning.  His statement above refers to just mode 2. If an early version of IS is on a gimball and tracking a bird going across his field of vision, it will still be looking for both axis of movement but only find one...and could degrade the image while still looking for side to side motion.
Also, he refers to a "Hogan article" that uses VR.  He then (in parenthesis) mentioned the 100-400. I wonder why he included that? I haven't seen that issue and am not aware of others experiencing it.
The rest of his quote I obviously agree with as I leave my IS on also. (Great minds think alike? Oh no..wait...)
But let it be known now: I can take blurry shots with shutter speeds over 1000.  It's hard but I can screw up ANY speed if I try hard enough!  (I think I have lousy panning techniques if I had to pinpoint a reason for that)

I can only give my experience with IS on the 300 F/4 and the 100-400.  I have tried both modes with both lens while shooting birds in flight to try to figure out which is best to use.  From my experience I have found out I don't know which one is better to use.  Taking a panning shot of a bird takes a lot of physical practice - I think Ocho may have been referring to Doodle when talking about an "old dog" about this.  I shot birds with both lens at or about 1600 shutter speed with an F-stop at or around 6.3-8.0, with my ISO on automatic ( which rarely exceeds 400).  The IS mode I use is not a concern for me, if I use one.  Although, have recently been playing with the two modes.  Mode 2 is for panning, but my challenge is taking shots of birds flying across my field of view then they fly in front of me.  Does mode 2 affect the quality of the shot when the bird is not flying horizontally?