Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
July 18, 2019, 10:13:31 AM


Author Topic: Maximum ISO?  (Read 2818 times)

Offline harryfew

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 90
Maximum ISO?
« on: June 17, 2013, 12:26:19 AM »
Hello,

I'm interested to find out what you guys think about shooting with high ISOs on the T2i / 550d?

I understand the benefits of higher ISOs so what I am asking is what is the highest ISO you would use for acceptable pics (i.e. before noise becomes too noticeable) say to a quality of printing out to A3?

I've had my T2i / 550d for 2yrs now and have loved it, I like to shoot in low (and natural) light conditions mainly with a 50mm f1.8 and rarely go above ISO 400.

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts!

Harry

Offline Fyrblade

  • Sr. Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 799
    • MAXXAM Originals
Re: Maximum ISO?
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2013, 05:02:46 AM »
For me it's all about the texture of what I'm shooting.

If I'm shooting what you might describe as a lot of solid colours in low light, I know that it will turn out pretty noisy. 

If I'm shooting something that can be better described as a mosaic then I'm not nearly as worried as the noise will blend in better.

I love the mood of low light photography.  My own interests allow me to go with a longer exposure to combat the need for a higher ISO.  This morning for example, I got off work early so I could catch the sunrise and prolong it with a couple of ND filters.
_______________________________
http://www.maxxamoriginals.com

Offline Doodle

  • Sr. Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 6511
  • Old age causes memory loss. Or worse, memory loss.
Re: Maximum ISO?
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2013, 07:25:01 AM »
harryfew,  it really depends on a multiple factors.  Here are a couple of considerations in no particular order:

How clean you want your photo to look (some people love noise *think grain* in their photos, especially B&W shots).
What software you have to remove excess noise.
If you shoot raw or jpeg, it can affect how easily you can remove the noise.
It also depends on whether you crop your photos or not. Noise becomes more prevalent as you crop or zoom into a photo.

Some will say you can safely go to 800 ISO with no problems.  Personally, I say try some photos at that level and see if you agree with them or not.  With that said, I believe that number was suggested based on no post processing.
If you have LightRoom, you have a way of removing noise.
If you have Photoshop or Photoshop Elements you can get a Plug-In called Topaz DeNoise.  There are other noise removing software programs (sorry....APPS now) but I am only familiar with DeNoise and I can safely say you can go much higher with such a program because it does a great job of removing noise.  (it also works with LightRoom too)

And finally, remember that if you DO go with a higher ISO and choose to remove the noise via a post processing program you will be having to make a trade off.  It will depend on how sharp you want your photo to be.  Removing noise in a photo "softens" the photo (effectively blurring it a little).  That's what those programs do.  You can (as a last step in your post processing) Sharpen the photo back a little but just know one process fights the other to a certain degree.   You will be 'softening' the photo somewhat to remove noise.  Afterwards you will be trying to sharpen the photo (like Unsharp Mask in PS) but it will re-introduce a small amount of noise again.   Sadly, the trade off is going to be up to your comfort level of what is acceptable or not.

Now...with all of THAT said:  I shoot up to 400 in the daylight and 800 in low light or night scenes and use DeNoise (then Topaz Detail for sharpening) at all ISO levels.  I may or may not use it but I will as least TRY it to see how it looks. I will either leave it applied or cancel it if it really didn't do anything for my shot.

Take your camera with you dammit. You can't take your next "best photo" if your camera is sitting at home in the bag, now can you?

Offline zubbuz

  • Sr. Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 3798
    • Zaavan Baildon Photography
Re: Maximum ISO?
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2013, 07:39:26 AM »
Also, remember that it is better to have a noisy shot than a blurry shot. Noise can be dealt with, blur not as easily. So bump up the ISO as far as you have to to get the non burry shot...

Of course if you are bumping it up to a point where the noise makes it unusable, you have to consider changing other factors like lighting etc, or a tripod for longer exposures...
You are young. Life has been kind to you. You will learn.

Canon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 / Canon 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II / Canon 10-22mm f/3.5-5.6 / Canon 50mm f1.8 / Rokinon 8mm 3.5 / Yongnuo YN-468 II

https://www.facebook.com/ZaavanBaildonPhotography

Offline SkierBoy

  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 2654
  • EVERY photographer was once an Amateur.
    • Dean Hewitt Photography
Re: Maximum ISO?
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2013, 05:18:19 PM »
I go up to 1600 sometimes if needed which can be quite often with the 100-400mm!
I once prayed to God for a camera, but quickly found out he didn't work that way.... so I stole a camera and prayed for his forgiveness.

CAMERAS - Canon 70D | Canon 550D | Canon Ixus 120 IS | Panasonic FZ7
LENSES - EF 100-400mm L IS | EF 70-200mm f/4 L IS | EF-S 15 - 85mm | EF-S 18 - 55mm | EF-S 55 - 250mm | EF 50mm f/1.8 II prime | EF-S 10-22mm
ACCESSORIES - Manfrotto 190XPROB Tripod | Giotto MML3270B Monopod | YN-465 Flash | Lowepro Fastpack 100 Rucsack
SOFTWARE - Picasa 3 | Photoshop Elements 9 | Photomatix 4.0 | Lightroom 4 with Topaz Plug-ins

Offline Doodle

  • Sr. Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 6511
  • Old age causes memory loss. Or worse, memory loss.
Re: Maximum ISO?
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2013, 05:41:26 PM »
I go up to 1600 sometimes if needed which can be quite often with the 100-400mm!
Skier...is that with the t2i?
Take your camera with you dammit. You can't take your next "best photo" if your camera is sitting at home in the bag, now can you?

Offline Suka

  • Sr. Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 1998
Re: Maximum ISO?
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2013, 05:56:30 PM »
I go up to 1600 sometimes if needed which can be quite often with the 100-400mm!

Skier, you get decent shots with the 100-400 at 1600 ISO?  Meaning, you don't have to do to much noise reduction via Denoise, or which ever program you use, and still get a clean/crisp/sharp photo?

Offline bandmandq

  • Sr. Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 2691
Re: Maximum ISO?
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2013, 08:58:13 PM »
I can concur with SkierBoy and using ISO 1600 on T2i.  I have done it several times.  I did do some noise reduction in LR but not a great deal.  Best results I ever got were shot in JPEG in a museum of artifacts of King Tut.  But then a "little" grain (noise) can be very desirable I think.
Canon T2i w/18-135mm lens, 55-250mm, 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L

Offline Skippy

  • Some people have a photographic memory but they have no film.
  • Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 7150
    • My Smugmug
Re: Maximum ISO?
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2013, 10:42:23 PM »
Let me add one thing to this discussion.

It is far better to make sure you get a proper exposure, meaning enough light, then it will be to under expose and then try to pull out dark spots in post. That is where noise is going to kill you.

I would not even begin to worry at 1600 so long as I was getting a good exposure. In day time hours, which is where I raise my ISO based on my own shooting habits, I really don't fear pushing the ISO to where ever I need to. Recently I was shooting the T2i at 3200 at a baseball game just to see what the result would be. I was plenty happy. Unfortunately then were just test shots so I did not save any of them but I was shooting about 1 full stop over and then pulling things back in post. I was plenty happy and would do it without hesitation. Now on the few shots that I shot slightly under it was a different story when I tried to pull up the exposure in post.
I'm an old film guy just playing catchup in this digital world. Help me out.

square root of 2:   f/1, f/1.4, f/2, f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6, f/8, f/11, f/16, f/22, f/32, f/45, f/64, f/90, f/128

Camera simulator. http://www.kamerasimulator.se/eng/?page_id=2

Offline zubbuz

  • Sr. Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 3798
    • Zaavan Baildon Photography
Re: Maximum ISO?
« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2013, 11:37:37 PM »
I use 1600 a lot for church internals where they don't like you setting up a tripod etc...
You are young. Life has been kind to you. You will learn.

Canon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 / Canon 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II / Canon 10-22mm f/3.5-5.6 / Canon 50mm f1.8 / Rokinon 8mm 3.5 / Yongnuo YN-468 II

https://www.facebook.com/ZaavanBaildonPhotography

Offline LeadinghamPhoto

  • Sr. Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Maximum ISO?
« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2013, 12:21:22 AM »
I used 1600 several times at the race track when I was using the t2i for everything.  I got some great shots still.
I've even used the 128000 for some night time shots of the moon and got some great shots.  I know you don't need to go that high for the moon, but I was curious.  I don't think I really used the noise reduction in LR4 either.  I used contrast to pull out some of the noise. 
Which you can use a lot of the sliders to pull out noise, not just the noise reduction ones. 
The poster formally known as Pineconetreehouse

Offline Bosch232

  • Sr. Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 1396
Re: Maximum ISO?
« Reply #11 on: June 18, 2013, 08:07:56 AM »
I took a photo of the sunset at ISO 1,000,000 and it turned out great!    ;D




Offline SkierBoy

  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 2654
  • EVERY photographer was once an Amateur.
    • Dean Hewitt Photography
Re: Maximum ISO?
« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2013, 04:37:57 PM »
I go up to 1600 sometimes if needed which can be quite often with the 100-400mm!

Skier, you get decent shots with the 100-400 at 1600 ISO?  Meaning, you don't have to do to much noise reduction via Denoise, or which ever program you use, and still get a clean/crisp/sharp photo?

Yes to both Suka & Doodle.
It's with the T2i.  I agree with Skippy. If it's dark and you're straining to get any kind of shot then the noise will show, however if you're using high ISO in average light to keep the shutter high then the results are much better. I also agree that the jpgs come out better than raw with no noise reduction. I do however use either LR or Topaz.
I once prayed to God for a camera, but quickly found out he didn't work that way.... so I stole a camera and prayed for his forgiveness.

CAMERAS - Canon 70D | Canon 550D | Canon Ixus 120 IS | Panasonic FZ7
LENSES - EF 100-400mm L IS | EF 70-200mm f/4 L IS | EF-S 15 - 85mm | EF-S 18 - 55mm | EF-S 55 - 250mm | EF 50mm f/1.8 II prime | EF-S 10-22mm
ACCESSORIES - Manfrotto 190XPROB Tripod | Giotto MML3270B Monopod | YN-465 Flash | Lowepro Fastpack 100 Rucsack
SOFTWARE - Picasa 3 | Photoshop Elements 9 | Photomatix 4.0 | Lightroom 4 with Topaz Plug-ins

Offline LeadinghamPhoto

  • Sr. Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Maximum ISO?
« Reply #13 on: June 19, 2013, 01:30:43 AM »
And to just expand on the part about it being dark the noise will show.  If you shoot a solid color, the noise will also show more than if something with patterns, is busy, etc.  Like if you're shooting a car that's a solid color, you'll see the noise in the car.  But if you're shooting a scene in a forest, the noise will be a lot less noticeable.
The poster formally known as Pineconetreehouse

Offline bandmandq

  • Sr. Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 2691
Re: Maximum ISO?
« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2013, 05:46:36 AM »
And to just expand on the part about it being dark the noise will show.  If you shoot a solid color, the noise will also show more than if something with patterns, is busy, etc.  Like if you're shooting a car that's a solid color, you'll see the noise in the car.  But if you're shooting a scene in a forest, the noise will be a lot less noticeable.

I can see that, just think of military camo, the computer generated that they use now.  It kind of looks like "noise".

(Yes, I know what I just said sounds backwards...I can see that and then mention camo in the same sentence.  What can I say, musicians think different that most of the rest of the world.)
Canon T2i w/18-135mm lens, 55-250mm, 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L