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February 19, 2019, 09:03:46 AM


Author Topic: For Suka and other bird nirds  (Read 3415 times)

Offline Ochotona

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For Suka and other bird nirds
« on: December 11, 2013, 11:14:07 AM »
Nice little newsletter from a local Audubon chapter with emphasis on bird photograpy.  I really liked the first part of the opening essay because it nicely states what makes me keep taking photos of birds.  Some good tips throughout.

http://www.montereyaudubon.org/2014_winter.pdf

Offline Doodle

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Re: For Suka and other bird nirds
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2013, 12:48:49 PM »
Thanks for posting.  I like his thought process. :)
Take your camera with you dammit. You can't take your next "best photo" if your camera is sitting at home in the bag, now can you?

Offline Suka

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Re: For Suka and other bird nirds
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2013, 07:20:47 PM »
Nice little newsletter from a local Audubon chapter with emphasis on bird photograpy.  I really liked the first part of the opening essay because it nicely states what makes me keep taking photos of birds.  Some good tips throughout.

http://www.montereyaudubon.org/2014_winter.pdf


I did a quick read of this and will get back to it because I am always looking for more tips for taking pics of birds, and learning more about them.  BTW, I may be a Bird Nerd, but I also like taking shots of landscapes.  It just happens my favorite thing to do now is to take shots of birds, because it is fun and a hard thing to do.

Offline Ochotona

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Re: For Suka and other bird nirds
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2013, 10:06:52 AM »
This is the part that really rang true for me:

"I started paying more attention to details I wasn’t seeing as only a “birder”. Suddenly I noticed things I had never paid attention to before; the contrast of a coot’s face actually holds some real beauty and the texture of a stilt’s legs are like artwork. It also opened my eyes to other things like the kinds of plants birds perch on and the actual beauty of the plant. Suddenly the average day bird watching, but seeing no rarities, went from a “blah” day to a day filled with life."

For me it was the brown towhee.  A common drab little bird that is a real beauty in its own way when you really look.

Offline Suka

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Re: For Suka and other bird nirds
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2013, 06:12:56 PM »
If someone would have told me four years ago I would have spent this much time, energy and $$ on shooting birds I would have asked where I'm shooting these birds, what type are they and what kind of gun I purchased.  Now I am loving what I am doing with the camera.  Trying to ID them, learning their calls, and the hardest part getting good shots of them is my newest life goal. I have some sort of Thrasher in my back yard every morning for the past few weeks but have been unable to get a decent shot of it because it's been too dark.  That bird is now number one on my list to shoot. 

Offline Ochotona

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Re: For Suka and other bird nirds
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2013, 06:45:04 PM »
Thrashers are very cool.  Good luck getting a shot.  I got some of a California thrasher this summer but they aren't good - directly into the sun.  They like deep, dark, brush cover.  You might try making pishing noises to get it to come out and look around.

Offline Suka

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Re: For Suka and other bird nirds
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2013, 07:04:41 PM »
Thrashers are very cool.  Good luck getting a shot.  I got some of a California thrasher this summer but they aren't good - directly into the sun.  They like deep, dark, brush cover.  You might try making pishing noises to get it to come out and look around.

I have a bird ID web site on my laptop, which has the birds vocals available.  Do you think using that would be useful?  Like I said have only heard this one real early in the mornings and got one glimpse of it when I was lucky enough to have the camera with me in the back yard.  There is a "hot spot" for some Thrashers in the desert not too far from me that I plan to explore soon.  Well, have been planning to explore for the past couple months so hopefully soon. 

Offline Ochotona

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Re: For Suka and other bird nirds
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2013, 07:25:09 PM »
Yes, that might work.  It would almost certainly work next spring/summer when breeding season comes around.

Offline Doodle

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Re: For Suka and other bird nirds
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2013, 03:36:04 AM »
This is the part that really rang true for me:

"I started paying more attention to details I wasn’t seeing as only a “birder”. Suddenly I noticed things I had never paid attention to before; the contrast of a coot’s face actually holds some real beauty and the texture of a stilt’s legs are like artwork. It also opened my eyes to other things like the kinds of plants birds perch on and the actual beauty of the plant. Suddenly the average day bird watching, but seeing no rarities, went from a “blah” day to a day filled with life."

For me it was the brown towhee.  A common drab little bird that is a real beauty in its own way when you really look.

It was the hummingbird for me.  Tiny little thing but when I finally started getting decent photos of it, I wanted to know what other birds were in my yard with a little more detail than LBJs (Little Brown Jobs). 
@ Suka, you mentioned your bird app.  I have come to love mine.  First off because it really does a great job of calling birds in and secondly I like it as a record keeper.  I only have 26 favorites so far, but these are the birds that I have been able to positively say I have seen and taken a photo of.  I add to that list as I see/identify/photograph each new bird I encounter.
Take your camera with you dammit. You can't take your next "best photo" if your camera is sitting at home in the bag, now can you?