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February 19, 2019, 09:08:22 AM


Author Topic: How can I achieve this film look?  (Read 3352 times)

Offline nahlanee

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How can I achieve this film look?
« on: January 29, 2014, 06:34:55 AM »
I came across videos like these
EVERYDAY on Vimeo
Kinfolk - The Life Aquatic on Vimeo


and would like to make such a look on my footage too, but its pretty difficult.

can someone help me out? where do I start and what are the main changes?


Offline Craig

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Re: How can I achieve this film look?
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2014, 07:10:38 AM »
Looks are created with software. What are you using to edit your footage?
6D, T2i, Canon 600EX, 430EXII, and some other stuff my wife doesn't know about.

Offline nahlanee

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Re: How can I achieve this film look?
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2014, 07:24:32 AM »
I know that they are created with software. Im an editor, but was never good at color grading. I use premiere pro and after effects with magic bullet looks and the built-in cc tools

Offline 1074

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Re: How can I achieve this film look?
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2014, 09:45:52 AM »
Shooting a flat profile to begin with will get you most of the way to this kind of look. Also, different cameras have different looks, making it easier to achieve a certain look by selecting different cameras before you shoot.

But if you have existing footage, you can take down the contrast a bit, and play with color levels or something similar to get close to this kind of thing.
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Offline Bif

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Re: How can I achieve this film look?
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2014, 10:38:51 PM »
The best starting point is with an understanding of basic photography.  Learning to "really see" light and it's effect on people and objects, how it defines shape and texture, how it helps create mood.  Along with this mastery of exposure, composition.  Becoming tuned into what basic lens focal lengths achieve, zooms make us very lazy.  So when I start planning a motion picture project I look at starting with 3 basic primes.

A "workhorse" wide angle (like the 18mm end of the 18-55mm "Kit" lens that comes with the Rebels), a 28mm or 30mm "fast prime" for the "normal" perspective the 50mm used to give us on 135 film, and a short "moderate telephoto" (like the EF 50mm f1.8).  My standard lens kit when I used Canon Rebels, 7D, and 60D was the following:  18mm end of the "kit" zoom, EF 24mm f2.8 for slightly wide "normal", EF 28mm f1.8 for "fast normal", and EF 50mm f1.8 for closeups.  I use Panasonic GH3's and GH4 now and replicated those focal lengths with MFT primes; 14mm f2.5, 20mm f1.7, 25mm f1.4 ("normal"), 45mm f1.8, and 75mm f1.8.  The range runs from 28mm equiv to 150mm equiv, I have wider and longer in zooms but the primes are what I use most.

There is no "shortcut".  I'd begin taking lots of stills, trying to make each one (or most anyway) as if it were a still frame in a scene that could be part of something like the videos you linked to.  Get out there and SHOOT, both stills and motion picture.  Learn the range of color and contrast correction tools in your video editor.

Good luck.

Good luck
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