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January 19, 2019, 08:50:59 PM


Author Topic: getting rid of shiny spots  (Read 2038 times)

Offline Scott S

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getting rid of shiny spots
« on: June 06, 2015, 04:23:03 AM »
ok, I do mostly portraits. I've been doing it professionally since the mid to late 90's. I got out of it for a while but am back into it again. the key to photography in this modern age, especially portraiture, is knowing how to quickly and effectively get things done in post. another important aspect is making it unnoticeable.
I use a program called GIMP. GIMP is free, and available for all of the major operating systems.
that said, what I'm going to do should be applicable in Photoshop as well. it's just been so long since I've used PS or Lightroom I may not use the correct nomenclature for it. I'll try to be as generic as possible.

ok, let's start. if you've ever used flashes, whether studio or speedlight you know you get unflattering shiny areas. the problem is, when trying to get rid of them it's difficult to do a job that's good and at the same time unnoticeable. the key is not going too far. you do have to leave some shiny area, it doesn't look right if you have this nice bright catchlight which clearly is from a flash and there's no hint of shiny areas. usually you get this overly smooth area that looks like someone found the Maybelline brush in Photoshop and applied it with a trowel.
so here it is, the secret of your humble master.

step one is to make a duplicate layer. it should be exactly like the original layer. so now you'll have two layers.



the next step is to use whatever tool you prefer to paint, or clone over the bright areas on your new layer. you don't have to be real precise, just paint away. use a light enough color, or clone from a light enough area that it's not too dark. you'll see what I mean in the photo. remember you're trying to make the blown out white areas look less light, not black.



there it is, not pretty, but there are no more white spots. now you set the layer mode to whatever your program has that looks like "Darken Only" Gimp uses Darken only, Photoshop may call it something else. the idea is it only makes visible pixels which are darker than the corresponding pixels in the original layer. from here you simply use the opacity slider to pull it back to the darkest you can and have it still look natural. in this case, it was around 36 percent. there's no right or wrong answer here, adjust it until it looks right to you.



and here's the finished portrait.


Offline Ochotona

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Re: getting rid of shiny spots
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2015, 01:17:16 PM »
This is technically over my head, but I see the difference and I like the improvement.  Thanks for sharing.

Offline Fyrblade

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Re: getting rid of shiny spots
« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2015, 09:57:08 PM »
I like the result as well.. With the opacity slider, you don't have to totally lose the detail contained in the pores etc so that's not too shabby considering how few steps are involved :)
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Offline Scott S

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Re: getting rid of shiny spots
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2015, 10:36:09 PM »
yeah, I'm all about super simple. I also don't like to go too far. you can use a darker color, or something, but to me, you have to have some small amount of shiny, just not as much as this one had. this way like you say keeps the pores and birth marks etc. but gets rid of anything lighter than the color you use to paint with. in this one I used the clone tool, you can see the small selection I used. I set the tool to stay put rather than align.